When Should You Get a Prostate Cancer Screening?

Cancer screening is the best way to find cancer early. An early diagnosis means easier, more effective treatment and less chance of it spreading. Many cancers, including prostate cancer, have no symptoms in the early stages. If you don’t have symptoms or regular screenings, prostate cancer can grow without you knowing you have it. Age is one of the factors associated with your risk, so identifying when you should get a screening can depend on many different factors. While men that don’t have existing high risk factors may be able to wait longer than other men to receive screening, it is important to evaluate each case individually.

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Categories: Cancer Screening, Prostate Cancer

How to Read a Prostate Cancer Pathology Report

If you’ve just received the results of a prostate pathology report from your doctor, you may have questions that you didn’t think about when you first spoke with your doctor.  While you can certainly always check back with your doctor for more clarification, we’ll walk you through the information that is included in a prostate pathology report. 

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Categories: Cancer Management, Cancer Screening, Prostate Cancer

New Colonoscopy Prep Tablet Approved by FDA

The FDA recently approved a new colonoscopy prep tablet that may make it easier for patients as they prepare for this colorectal cancer screening procedure. Until now, patients had to drink a gallon of a bad-tasting liquid to clean out the colon before the test, allowing doctors to complete a thorough evaluation. If you know anybody who has prepared for a colonoscopy, they likely remember this drink very well. Unfortunately, about one-third of patients usually don't drink all of the liquid prep, which means doctors may not have the best view during the screening. 

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Categories: Cancer Screening, Colorectal Cancer

What Causes Colon Polyps?

You may know that colon polyps can lead to colon cancer, but you may not know what causes colon polyps. The answers may surprise you.

Colon polyps are small clumps of cells that can form on the lining of the lower intestine, or colon. Polyps can occur in several locations throughout your gastrointestinal tract, but they most commonly occur in your colon. Polyps can also develop in the last part of the colon, known as the rectum. Doctors often refer to conditions occurring in the colon and rectum together, using the term “colorectal.”

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Categories: Cancer Prevention, Cancer Risk, Cancer Screening, Colorectal Cancer

Do Breast Calcifications Mean That I Have Breast Cancer?

Many women experience a phone call from their breast imaging center. The call often concerns the patient coming back for additional imaging of tiny white spots called calcifications. Calcifications are frequently seen on mammograms — they occur most often in women over 50. They may appear in any woman's breasts and, occasionally, occur in a man's breast tissue.

Most breast calcifications are benign (non-cancerous). However, a few patterns of calcification are suggestive of some precancerous conditions or, even, breast cancer.

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Categories: Breast Cancer, Cancer Screening

What Should I Expect at My First Mammogram?

The mammogram is an important breast cancer screening and diagnostic tool for women. This highly effective, non-invasive, and inexpensive procedure detects breast cancer and saves lives. The American Cancer Society recommends women start breast cancer screening at age 45. However, research has found mammograms are most beneficial for women age 50 and older. Regular mammograms reduce the risk of dying from breast cancer by 14% among 50- to 60-year-olds and 33% among 60- to 69-year-olds.

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Categories: Breast Cancer, Cancer Screening

Prostate Cancer and Alcohol: What We Need to Know

It has been established by cancer researchers that alcohol is a risk factor for many types of cancers. What may not be that well known is the fact that alcohol is not a risk factor, maybe even be a risk reducer for other types cancers. So how does alcohol specifically affect prostate cancer? This blog is going to take a look at the relation between alcohol consumption and prostate cancer.

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Categories: Cancer Risk, Cancer Screening, Prostate Cancer

When Should You Start Colon Cancer Screenings?

Did you know that the screening age for colorectal cancer was lowered to 45?

Based on recent research, the American Cancer Society (ACS) lowered the recommended age to begin colon cancer screening from 50 to 45. The five-year difference is important to note when it comes to managing your health care. The ACS predicts that in 2019 more than 23,000 Oregonians will receive a diagnosis of colon cancer. Learning more about the screening process is one step a patient can take in preventing and fighting this dreaded disease.

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Categories: Cancer Prevention, Cancer Screening, Colorectal Cancer, Gastrointestinal Cancers

Lymph Nodes: An Early Warning Sign of Cancer

Lymph nodes (also called lymph glands) are part of your immune system, and they let you know when your body is fighting an infection by becoming enlarged or sensitive to the touch. They also function as an early warning system for some types of cancer, including lymphoma, leukemia, and breast cancer.

What are Lymph Nodes?

Lymph is a clear fluid that circulates throughout your body, bringing nutrients to cells and carrying away bacteria and waste products. This fluid flows through a special system of tiny vessels in your body, passing through small bean-shaped filtering organs called lymph nodes. Some nodes are as large as an inch across, while others are as small as a pinhead. 

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Categories: Cancer Screening, Lymphomas

How Does Your Family’s History of Melanoma Affect You?

Melanoma is the most dangerous type of skin cancer. It forms in the cells that produce melanin, which is the substance responsible for your skin's color. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UV rays) from the sun or tanning beds increases the risk of developing any skin cancer. In the case of melanoma, experts say there's also a strong link between family genetics and your risk of developing melanoma. 

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Categories: Cancer Prevention, Cancer Screening, Genetic Testing, Skin Cancer