6 Helpful Tips for Tobacco Users to Quit Smoking and Reduce Lung Cancer Risk

The Compass Oncology lung cancer specialists encourage everyone to take a moment on March 20th to observe "National Kick Butts Day.” This day focuses on the health risks of tobacco use, including smoking, as a part of our practice’s efforts to reduce the number of lung cancer cases diagnosed each year. According to the National Cancer Institute, that’s close to 700 cases each year in the Portland-Vancouver area.

Read More

Categories: Cancer Prevention, Cancer Risk, Lung Cancer

Tobacco Use After Cancer

You probably know tobacco use is bad for your health. In fact, over-the-counter tobacco products are legally required to include one of the following warning labels reminding the public of tobacco’s dangers, especially the dangers of cancer.

Read More

Categories: Cancer Risk, Cancer Survivorship, Survivorship & Health

Is Your Weight Affecting Your Risk of Developing Cancer?

It’s no secret that carrying excess pounds can lead to serious health consequences–but did you know that it can also raise your risk for certain types of cancer? Alarming numbers from recent studies conclude that the vast majority of American adults are overweight or obese--and it appears to be a trend that is a growing problem among US children as well.

Research shows that higher amounts of body fat can increase the risk for several types of cancer, including kidney cancer, liver cancer, colon cancer, rectal cancer, endometrial cancer, esophageal cancer, pancreatic cancer, gallbladder cancer, thyroid cancer, ovarian cancer, cervical cancer, and breast cancer (in women past menopause). Obesity also increases the risk for developing advanced prostate cancer, which is the most dangerous stage of the disease. 

Read More

Categories: Cancer Risk

A Simple Test Could Let You Know if You’re at High Risk for Developing Colon Cancer

Cancer researchers from Johns Hopkins have concluded that some patients may develop colon cancer due to two specific digestive bacterias that form a film on the colon.

The two bacteria the doctors found working together to heighten cancer are known as Bacteroides fragilis and Escherichia coli (or E. coli). The B. fragilis strain, called ETBF, appears to cause inflammation in the colon, while the E. coli strain causes DNA mutations. 

Read More

Categories: Cancer Prevention, Cancer Risk, Cancer Screening, Colorectal Cancer

Eat Healthy and Get Active for Cancer Prevention

Daily habits like diet and exercise can affect your risk for cancer more than you may realize. According to the American Cancer Society (ACS), poor diet and inactivity are two key factors that can put a person at a higher risk for cancer.

Eat a Healthy Variety of Foods

Although eating healthy foods does not guarantee cancer prevention, it can certainly help reduce your risk. Making wise decisions about what you eat not only provides your body with the essential vitamins, minerals, and nutrients it needs, it also helps make it easier to maintain a healthy weight.

The ACS has some guidelines to consider in regards to what you eat from day to day, including: 

Read More

Categories: Cancer Prevention, Cancer Risk

5 Common Cancer Myths Debunked

The internet can be an extremely useful tool for people seeking information on specific healthcare topics like cancer. And while there is a lot of data out there to be read, it is important to keep in mind that not all online sources offer reliable information. We’ve come a long way when it comes to understanding cancer--yet many myths and misconceptions continue to leave people confused and searching for answers. Busting these cancer myths, and learning more about what has actually been proven, is a great way to get people closer to truly understanding this complex group of diseases known as cancer.

Here are 5 commonly held myths about cancer: 

Read More

Categories: Cancer Prevention, Cancer Risk, Cancer Screening, Genetic Testing

5 Things You Can Do to Prevent Cervical Cancer

Something every woman should know is that cervical cancer is almost always preventable. Understanding more about cervical health is the best action you can take to help prevent this kind of cancer. Here’s what you need to know.

What Causes Cervical Cancer?

Cervical cancer is a type of cancer that occurs in the cells of the cervix, which is the lower part of the uterus (womb) that connects to the vagina (birth canal). According to the National Cervical Cancer Coalition, about 99% of cervical cancers are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), a common sexually transmitted disease (STD).

Read More

Categories: Cancer Prevention, Cancer Risk, Cervical Cancer

What Does the Great American Smokeout Have to Do with Lung Cancer Risk?

What is the American Cancer Society's Great American Smokeout? It's an annual event, held the third Thursday of every November, a date on which smokers nationwide are asked to give up smoking. This year, 2017, that means it’s on November 16th. Quitting for just one day helps you take action toward a healthier life, and reduce your lung cancer risk.

Each year, the Great American Smokeout calls attention to the deaths, lung cancer diagnoses and other chronic diseases that smoking causes, and how to prevent them. As a result of this event, there have been actions taken towards reducing the health impacts that smoking can have on smokers and non-smokers including:

  • Many states and local governments have banned smoking in restaurants, public spaces, and workplaces.
  • Increased taxes on cigarettes
  • Limiting of cigarette advertisements and product placements.
Read More

Categories: Cancer Prevention, Cancer Risk, Lung Cancer

What You Should Know About Oral, Head, and Neck Cancer

Oral, head and neck cancer is cancer that begins in the internal tissue of somewhere in your mouth, neck or head -- excluding cancers of the eye, skin, and brain. The major areas that are usually affected by this type of cancer include:

  • sinuses
  • nasal cavity
  • salivary glands
  • pharynx (the part of the upper part of the throat that's right behind the mouth)
  • larynx (the lower part of the throat that holds the voice box)
  • gums
  • cheek lining
  • lips
  • floor of mouth
  • hard palate
  • gum behind the wisdom teeth
Read More

Categories: Cancer Prevention, Cancer Risk, Oral, Head and Neck Cancer

Alcohol and Its Link to Cancer

It's fairly common knowledge that an occasional glass of red wine has been shown to boost heart health. Even beer has been linked to "some benefit against cardiovascular disease, according to a study published in the peer-reviewed journal Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases. And, at least one study from by the European Journal of Cancer Prevention suggests alcohol could reduce the risk of Hodgkin lymphoma.

Before you pop a cork or tab and say, "Cheers, I'll drink to that!" there are risks you should be aware of. A growing body of evidence suggests a worrisome link between alcohol consumption and certain types of cancers.

Read More

Categories: Cancer Prevention, Cancer Risk