5 Things You Can Do to Prevent Cervical Cancer

Something every woman should know is that cervical cancer is almost always preventable. Understanding more about cervical health is the best action you can take to help prevent this kind of cancer. Here’s what you need to know.

What Causes Cervical Cancer?

Cervical cancer is a type of cancer that occurs in the cells of the cervix, which is the lower part of the uterus (womb) that connects to the vagina (birth canal). According to the National Cervical Cancer Coalition, about 99% of cervical cancers are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), a common sexually transmitted disease (STD).

Read More

Categories: Cancer Prevention, Cancer Risk, Cervical Cancer

What Does the Great American Smokeout Have to Do with Lung Cancer Risk?

What is the American Cancer Society's Great American Smokeout? It's an annual event, held the third Thursday of every November, a date on which smokers nationwide are asked to give up smoking. This year, 2017, that means it’s on November 16th. Quitting for just one day helps you take action toward a healthier life, and reduce your lung cancer risk.

Each year, the Great American Smokeout calls attention to the deaths, lung cancer diagnoses and other chronic diseases that smoking causes, and how to prevent them. As a result of this event, there have been actions taken towards reducing the health impacts that smoking can have on smokers and non-smokers including:

  • Many states and local governments have banned smoking in restaurants, public spaces, and workplaces.
  • Increased taxes on cigarettes
  • Limiting of cigarette advertisements and product placements.
Read More

Categories: Cancer Prevention, Cancer Risk, Lung Cancer

How Eating Healthy Foods Can Help Prevent Cancer

Eating a healthy, balanced diet provides your body with vitamins, minerals, and nutrients to get you through your day. But did you know that eating a healthy diet can also reduce your risk of certain types of cancers? Discover some cancer-fighting foods that may be no further away than your pantry or refrigerator.

Read More

Categories: Cancer Prevention

What You Should Know About Oral, Head, and Neck Cancer

Oral, head and neck cancer is cancer that begins in the internal tissue of somewhere in your mouth, neck or head -- excluding cancers of the eye, skin, and brain. The major areas that are usually affected by this type of cancer include:

  • sinuses
  • nasal cavity
  • salivary glands
  • pharynx (the part of the upper part of the throat that's right behind the mouth)
  • larynx (the lower part of the throat that holds the voice box)
  • gums
  • cheek lining
  • lips
  • floor of mouth
  • hard palate
  • gum behind the wisdom teeth
Read More

Categories: Cancer Prevention, Cancer Risk, Oral, Head and Neck Cancer

Could Your Skincare Products Make You More Prone to Sunburns?

Male or female, young or young at heart, if you use skincare products it’s safe to assume you’re committed to keeping your skin healthy and attractive. However, some of the products you rely on to achieve those goals may actually increase your risk of sunburn – which can put you at a greater risk of developing skin cancer. It can also make your skin show more wrinkles, sunspots and other signs of premature aging.

Four Products That Can Cause Sun Sensitivity

Below are four types of products you may be using that are known to cause sun sensitivity and could increase your likelihood of sunburn, especially if you’re not using SPF.
Read More

Categories: Cancer Prevention, Skin Cancer

Alcohol and Its Link to Cancer

It's fairly common knowledge that an occasional glass of red wine has been shown to boost heart health. Even beer has been linked to "some benefit against cardiovascular disease, according to a study published in the peer-reviewed journal Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases. And, at least one study from by the European Journal of Cancer Prevention suggests alcohol could reduce the risk of Hodgkin lymphoma.

Before you pop a cork or tab and say, "Cheers, I'll drink to that!" there are risks you should be aware of. A growing body of evidence suggests a worrisome link between alcohol consumption and certain types of cancers.

Read More

Categories: Cancer Prevention, Cancer Risk

Colorectal Cancer and Young Adults: What You Need to Know

The Journal of the National Cancer Institute published in February that colorectal cancer in young adults has risen dramatically in generations born after 1950. Those currently between the ages of 18-27 have 2 times the risk of developing colon cancer and 4 times the risk of developing rectal cancer than people born in the 1950s were when they were between those ages.

Read More

Categories: Cancer Prevention, Cancer Screening, Colorectal Cancer

How Can I Reduce My Risk of Cervical Cancer?

Each January is recognized as Cervical Health Awareness Month, spreading the knowledge about women’s health and how they can help prevent the development of cervical cancer and related diseases. Some aren’t as familiar with what cervical cancer is, or that there are precautions you can take to reduce your risk of developing cervical cancer. Here are a few facts to share with friends and family as we recognize Cervical Health Awareness Month.

Read More

Categories: Cancer Prevention, Cancer Risk, Cervical Cancer

How to Reduce Your Risk of Developing Lung Cancer

New cases of lung cancer in Oregon were down by 3% between 2009 and 2013. That's great news! But as one of the most preventable types of cancer, there is more work to be done.

At Compass Oncology, we're participating in Lung Cancer Awareness Month by helping raise awareness of this often preventable disease. Lung cancer is the second most common type of cancer diagnosis in both men and women. We encourage you to educate yourself and join us in spreading the word about the prevalence of lung cancer and the best ways to reduce the risks of developing it.

Four Things You Can Do to Reduce the Risk of Lung Cancer

Read More

Categories: Cancer Prevention, Cancer Risk, Lung Cancer

There’s No Such Thing as a Safe Tan

We Pacific Northwesterners love our sun. After a long wet winter, summer calls to us with all the beauty our great outdoors has to offer. Outside we go, many of us to soak up a little sun – but be careful, our region has one of the highest incidences of melanoma in the United States. We’re not quite sure why that is but we’re definitely sure everyone can reduce their risk of developing melanoma and other skin cancers with some sun safe precautions.

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the U.S. with 3.5 million skin cancers in more than 2 million people being diagnosed annually. That’s higher than the incidence of breast, prostate, lung and colon cancer combined. It’s the 5th most common cancer in men and the 7th in women.

Read More

Categories: Cancer Prevention, Cancer Screening, Skin Cancer